Dani Rodrik on Populism

Is it culture or economics? That question frames much of the debate about contemporary populism. Are Donald Trump’s presidency, Brexit, and the rise of right-wing nativist political parties in continental Europe the consequence of a deepening rift in values between social conservatives and social liberals, with the former having thrown their support behind xenophobic, ethno-nationalist, authoritarian politicians? Or do they reflect many voters’ economic anxiety and insecurity, fueled by financial crises, austerity, and globalization?

The document can be found here

Brazil at the eve of a terrible change

Elections in Brazil, on October 7, will probably change the characteristics of democracy. The election of Bolsonaro would amplify the populist wave seen with Trump, Orban, Conte, Duterte or Erdogan.

The Brazilian society may then become more violent as Bolsonaro doesn’t respect women and gays, he is a racist and accept violent behaviors from the police to fight crime. Two papers linked below give insights on ” who is Bolsonaro?” and why is he the favorite for this election.

Papers from Project Syndicate and from Foreign Affairs